Big 12: Baylor Bears

Big 12 morning links

March, 5, 2015
Mar 5
9:00
AM ET
This should be an interesting 30 for 30. I'm looking forward to it.
  • Sam Richardson has grown into a strong leader for Iowa State, writes Bobby La Gesse of the Ames Tribune. Richardson's leadership can be seen on and off the practice field for the Cyclones heading into his fifth season. Richardson is easily the Big 12's most overlooked returning quarterback. Richardson's 56.2 career completion percentage must improve, but if it does, he could help the Cyclones return to a bowl game.
  • Those who have worked with Marcus Arroyo have plenty of praise for Oklahoma State's new assistant coach, reports Kyle Frederickson of The Oklahoman. Change has come to the Cowboys coaching staff and Arroyo is an intriguing hire as a guy who was calling plays for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers last season and has experience as a offensive coordinator. Mike Gundy clearly wanted to supplement the offensive coaching staff by adding creative, experienced minds and looks like Arroyo fits the bill.
  • Baylor offensive tackle Spencer Drango decided to return to Waco to get better. Becoming a unanimous All-American, winning the Outland Trophy and allowing zero sacks are among the goals for Drango, who could have left early for the NFL. Drango is one of the reasons I consider the Bears alongside TCU as a favorite in the conference. His return along with the rest of BU's offensive line will make life easier for whoever wins the starting job for Art Briles' team.
  • This look back at TCU's Class of 2012 is a reminder of how well Gary Patterson's program evaluates on the recruiting trail. Derrick Kindred, Joey Hunt and James McFarland are among the three-star recruits who have developed into key pieces of the Horned Frogs team. That should make TCU fans rest easy despite the fact the Horned Frogs did not sign a player in the ESPN 300 in the Class of 2015.
  • On the other side of the equation this look at Oklahoma's Class of 2012 isn't pretty for Sooners fans. Sure the class included standouts Sterling Shepard, Eric Striker and Charles Tapper but it also featured names like Gary Simon, John Michael McGee and Taylor McNamara who never became impact players for the Sooners. OU's recruiting is moving in a much better direction in recent years but it's a revealing glimpse at OU's struggles to evaluate a few years ago.

Q&A: Baylor LT Spencer Drango

March, 4, 2015
Mar 4
3:00
PM ET
Baylor left tackle Spencer Drango earned All-America honors last season then elected to come back for his senior season and another shot at a national title. What’s he working on this spring? How do his quarterbacks look? When will he get to catch a pass? We caught up with Drango before Baylor’s first spring practice last week.

What have you guys seen from Seth Russell so far?

[+] EnlargeSpencer Drango
AP Photo/Tony GutierrezSpencer Drango will see to it that Baylor's new QB is well protected.
Drango: He’s shown us that he can be the leader of this team. As far as who has the position, I think it’s still up in the air. The coaches decide that. But all of our guys have been busting their butt. Seth has stepped up to fill that leadership role that’s been vacated by other guys.

What do you like about Jarrett Stidham from getting to watch him work?

Drango: He’s an overall good guy. I haven’t seen much on the field, just seen him throw a little bit. Just like Seth, it doesn’t look like he’s putting much effort into it to throw 65 or 70 yards. I know he can run, I’ve seen that a little on his highlights. It should be a lot of fun to watch him work.

In what ways can you improve after already earning All-America honors?

Drango: Well hopefully I can get unanimous All-American. That’s one of my goals. And then another one of my goals is to win the Outland Trophy. I was a semifinalist last year so I’d like to improve on that. And just here and there, pass pro, getting back to my old self I guess. I got there about halfway through last season. Pass blocking, I still didn’t feel like I was quite back to 100 percent on that. I had to adjust. Now that I’ve got a lot of my strength back, it should help a lot.

Was it important to you, in coming back this year, to help this offense through a transition to a new quarterback?

Drango: I think so, and I think it’s on the whole line in general to maintain that protection we’ve had in the quarterbacks of the past -- and not just maintain, but improve upon it. I don’t know how many sacks we gave up last year. One is too many. I’d like to see us give up none, and I think we can. We definitely have the talent on the line and mindset to be able to do that.

How motivated is this team after the Cotton Bowl loss?

Drango: We’re extremely motivated. Offseason was very intense. We wanted it that way. We wanted to weed out and get rid of the bad habits we had and get focused on doing things right and staying right. Having motivation is always a good thing.

Has LaQuan McGowan been asking for more chances to catch the ball?

Drango: I think every O-lineman is asking for more chances to catch the ball.

Well why haven’t you?

Drango: Uh, you know … coaching, I think. I’d be more than willing to do it, but I think …

You’re an All-American now. You can ask for that, right?

Drango: Well I would hope so. I think, position-wise, it works out better for him to do it than me. Just in the spot I’m at and the spot he’s at, it works out better for him to go do it. I love it.

It might tip the opponent off if you’re lined up in the slot.

Drango: Yeah, exactly. I don’t know, maybe we can do a tackle screen or something like that. That’d be fun.

When you guys were setting up that play, did you ever think they might actually run it in a game?

Drango: Any play that we run in practice, I think we can run it in a game. We have some crazy stuff that we run just to mess around. Coach Briles has some of those plays he loves.

So there are much crazier plays than that one we haven’t seen yet?

Drango: Uh, I don’t know about much crazier. I don’t know if you can get much more crazy than a 400-pounder scoring a touchdown. But every team has their tricks. We’ve got to have a lineman throw him the ball. That would be kind of fun. I don’t know if that’s going to happen. I’ll talk to Coach.
A closer look at a few important position battles in the Big 12 entering spring practice:

Baylor: Middle linebacker
Aiavion Edwards vs. Grant Campbell

Replacing Bryce Hager, one of the Big 12’s most underappreciated stars, won’t be easy. He was the quarterback of Baylor’s defense, and his successor inherits a lot of responsibility. Edwards started five games last season while Campbell, a junior college transfer, served as Hager’s top backup. They’ll be aided by the return of exciting sophomore Taylor Young, who took Edwards’ job at weakside linebacker last year. Defensive coordinator Phil Bennett is going to let Edwards and Campbell keep competing until the right fit is found, and it’s been a good battle so far.

[+] EnlargeTrevor Knight
Jackson Laizure/Getty ImagesTrevor Knight will need to find consistency this offseason to earn the nod as Oklahoma's starting QB.
Oklahoma: Quarterback
Trevor Knight vs. Baker Mayfield vs. Cody Thomas

The great variable here is new offensive coordinator Lincoln Riley and the Sooners’ transition to Air Raid-style football. All three of his QB candidates have starting experience in the Big 12. Knight needs to stay healthy and get much more consistent. Mayfield has experience in this scheme and needs to show the spark he provided Texas Tech as a freshman in 2012. And Thomas, who dropped baseball to focus on winning this job, just needs to keep pushing them. All three are in for a rigorous offseason of learning under Riley’s watch.

Oklahoma State: Running back
Rennie Childs vs. Sione Palelei

Chris Carson, the touted juco signee who flipped from Georgia, doesn’t arrive in Stillwater until the summer. Neither does freshman Jeff Carr. That means Childs, Palelei and the rest of the Cowboys' backs have the spring to prove they deserve carries this fall. Childs has rushed for 483 yards and five scores as a reserve over the past two years, while the speedy Palelei redshirted last year. Carson seems like the safe bet to be this group’s workhorse when he arrives, but somebody has to tote the rock this spring.

TCU: Cornerback
Corry O’Meally vs. DeShawn Raymond vs. Nick Orr vs. Cameron Echols-Luper

The Horned Frogs are expected to have a wide-open battle for the spot Kevin White held down for three years, and all four of these guys bring different traits to the table. O’Meally and Orr played as reserves in their first year as Frogs. Raymond, a four-star early enrollee, would be TCU’s biggest option here at 6-foot-1. And Echols-Luper, a prolific returner, just switched from receiver to corner this offseason. There’s not a lot of experience among this group, but there is a lot of potential.

Texas: Quarterback
Tyrone Swoopes vs. Jerrod Heard

Swoopes started 12 games last season and at times showed flashes of an exciting future. He also struggled mightily against TCU and Arkansas to end the year. How much better can he get as a junior? Heard, a redshirt freshman, was nowhere near ready to play last year in the eyes of co-offensive coordinator Shawn Watson. We’ll see how both respond to playing in a higher-tempo offense this spring, and whether ESPN 300 signee Kai Locksley tests them in the summer. Texas badly needs stability and leadership at this spot as well as a much-improved line.

Texas Tech: Defensive tackle
Rika Levi vs. Keland McElrath vs. Demetrius Alston vs. Breiden Fehoko

What’ll makes this group fun to watch is the influence of their new position coach, fiery co-defensive coordinator Mike Smith. He’ll push Tech’s big men like never before. Levi didn’t play up to the hype last year, but he’s looking much better this spring now that he’s dropped 20 pounds. Tech fans will be clamoring to see Fehoko, Tech’s top-rated signee, on the field as soon as possible. Anthony Smith, Marcus Smith and the injured Donte Phillips are also in the mix. Considering Tech’s inability to stop the run last year, finding the right combo here is important.

West Virginia: Quarterback
Skyler Howard vs. William Crest vs. Paul Millard

Howard showed dramatic improvement leading up to his three-game audition to end 2014. He lost two of those three, but threw eight TDs and played with confidence when he got his shot. West Virginia fans are rightfully excited about Crest, a dual-threat redshirt freshman whose first year was cut short by a shoulder issue. Millard and true freshmen Chris Chugunov and David Sills are also battling for this job, giving Dana Holgorsen better QB depth than he’s had in a while. If Crest proves he’s ready to lead now, he might run away with this race.
Following his showing at the NFL scouting combine, Bryce Petty is back in San Diego training with George Whitfield and preparing for his Baylor pro day on March 18. We caught up with the former Baylor quarterback to talk about the draft process, the “system quarterback” perceptions and working alongside Jameis Winston.

You've been training with Jameis Winston. How's that going?

That guy is a grinder. He goes to work. That's what I love about him. I understand he's got a whole bunch of outside attention, but what people don't understand is there's so much more to him. It's been cool to go to work with him and we really balance each other out and help each other. In the film room and on the board, that guy is a wizard. He's very knowledgeable about defenses and protections. It's been a blast and we get each other's best.

I'm sure you'll have a lot of stories from hanging with him for a few months, right?

Possibly. Who knows? They all go in my bank, man. Sorry, y'all don't get those.

Tell me about the combine. What'd you think of your performance?

[+] EnlargeBryce Petty
Jamie Squire/Getty ImagesBaylor QB Bryce Petty threw for 3,855 yards and 29 touchdowns during his final season at Baylor.
You know what? Kinda crazy, but I actually thought I underperformed in the things I wanted to do. I was pretty upset about my 40. I was running low 4.6's coming into the combine and busted out a 4.87, which kind of sucks. I know a 40 is not too high on the priority list of what scouts are looking for, but anytime they say, ‘This kid's athletic and can move,' you want to cross that box off. I wasn't happy with that.

Also, on the throws, I missed a throw or two out of every series, which is unlike me and what I'd been doing. To answer your question, it was a great four days as far as getting to know coaches and GMs and scouts. They want to talk about our offense. It's funny how many people love watching our offense. They love it enough to bash it, I guess.

You're getting a lot of questions about the Baylor offense during this process. How do you sell executives on your ability to play in any system?

Things like, ‘Are you a system quarterback?,' to me, I laugh at it. Yes, the quarterbacks that have came through have been very successful. At the same time, you still have to have some ability to play quarterback to run that offense. For what we might've lacked in a progression-style, West Coach verbiage offense, we made up for in the sense that a lot of my throws were anticipated throws. All of our routes have options. You know from coverage what they're going to do. Secondly, our play calling is built for tempo. We don't need a whole lot of verbiage. So when you're calling out one play and you've got to know what everybody's doing on that one play, it almost balances itself out as far as the intellectual part.

We do have a knock for our offense and how it translates, but at the same time, man, to me it's all about the person. That's what I try to lobby. You can measure my height, weight and hand size, look at my film, but you can't measure work ethic and heart and desire to win and drive to be the best. I'm going to put in all the work I can to be the best. I'll bring a certain energy and passion about the game. I'm not worried about it at all. I'm excited. I know I'm going to take my bumps and bruises and get yelled at here and there, but that's part of the process. I'm going to give it my all and that's what I'm trying to lobby. If you're not with that or you're calling B.S., that's fine. Hopefully someone will take that and run with it.

How do you deal with the uncertainty of whether you're going in the first round?

If you sit here and read all the tidbits and worry about where I'm going, it just causes more stress than I need. What gives me peace at night is my faith and knowing God is going to put me exactly where I'm supposed to be, on a team that wants me, on a team I want to be on. For a while, I wanted to be the No. 1 guy taken and the No. 1 overall pick, but that made me put too much pressure on myself during the season. Now I'm just enjoying the process. I don't care where I'm drafted. All I care about is that first day of camp and the rest of the days on that team. ‘Where do they peg him? Where does he go?' Who cares and who knows? All that matters is what I do when I get there.

At this point, do you have any sense of who wants to draft you?

I know if mom had a team or she was a GM, she'd take me. That's as secure an answer as I have. No idea. That's one of the cool parts about it: the anxiousness, the nervousness of where you're gonna go, who's gonna take you, when they're gonna take you. But I'm not too concerned about it now. I'm enjoying it and living out my childhood dream. I'm gonna end up exactly where I'm supposed to be and give that team my all and have fun doing it.

Big 12 morning links

March, 4, 2015
Mar 4
9:00
AM ET
Congrats to the Jayhawks. Eleven straight Big 12 titles ain't easy.
  • Chuck McGill of the Charleston Daily Mail shares the story of West Virginia assistant JaJuan Seider, whose 14-year-old son was diagnosed with cancer and had two tumors removed in January. Jaden Seider is currently in chemotherapy -- fortunately, his cancer was 100-percent treatable -- and fans from both West Virginia and Marshall have rallied to show their support with a #SeiderStrong hashtag. Jade sure sounds like one tough kid. Be sure to give this one a read.
  • Baker Mayfield has beaten the odds before, so why can't he win the job at Oklahoma? Jason Kersey of The Oklahoman does a nice job of tracing Mayfield's competitive streak and perseverance back to his days at Lake Travis High in Austin, where he earned the starting job after an injury and never gave it up. Those who know him best are confident Mayfield will find a way to become QB No. 1 at OU. He's the guy I'd bet on right now, too, based on that mean streak and his now-convenient knowledge of Air Raid concepts.
  • Art Briles shared some wonderful news on Tuesday: the great 400-pound behemoth LaQuan McGowan is getting work at tight end and H-back this spring. Briles says the Bears will try to experiment with him in non-conference play if possible. The staff is hesitant to let him loose this spring in case he injures someone, which is a reasonable fear. Though McGowan's TD against Michigan State got all the glory, I liked how Baylor found ways late in the season to use McGowan as a bonus blocker in goal-line power sets. Why not see what else he can do?
  • As expected, a lot of eyes at Iowa State are on junior college transfer Desmond Tucker right now. The Cyclones expect the defensive tackle to take a starting job, but he'll have to earn it first. Bobby La Gesse of the Ames Tribune offers a good breakdown of where Tucker stands and what he's working on (hands first) as he tries to prove himself. ESPN's No. 3 rated juco DT prospect is already displaying impressive athleticism and could make a big impact once he gets all caught up.
  • Best of luck to former West Virginia quarterback Clint Trickett, who's reportedly set to become the new quarterbacks coach at Eastern Mississippi Community College. Trickett is following in his father's and brother's footsteps and diving right into the coaching world after concussions ended his playing days at WVU. Trickett consistently earned praise during his stint at WVU for his knowledge of the game, and this is no small-time gig. EMCC has won three NJCAA titles in the last four years and its last QB, Chad Kelly, signed with Ole Miss.

Big 12 Tuesday mailbag

March, 3, 2015
Mar 3
4:00
PM ET
In Tuesday's mailbag, Tom Bradley's departure, a May signing day and Kansas State's record are among the topics. As always, thanks for your questions (and thanks for not asking about expansion this time around). To submit questions for next week's mailbag, click here.

Scott in Edgewater, Maryland, writes: Tom Bradley left for UCLA, is this going to negatively effect West Virginia, and why did he leave after just one year?

Brandon Chatmon: I think it hurts the Mountaineers, no question about it. Bradley brought tons of experience and a veteran presence to the WVU coaching staff while helping solidify the defense. It’s a big loss for Dana Holgorsen’s program but not one that is impossible to overcome. As far as why, who wouldn’t want to go to UCLA? Sign me up.


Aaron Terhume in Lenexa, Kansas, writes: With K-State's hardest games at home next year (TCU, Oklahoma, Baylor & West Virginia) what are the odds of an 8+ win season for the CATS?

BC: It feels like you’re overrating the home-field advantage a tad here, Aaron. The Wildcats still have to replace Jake Waters, Tyler Lockett, Ryan Mueller and B.J. Finney, who were among the best in the Big 12 at their positions. I think the home field will help but 7-8 wins sounds about right before spring football kicks off and we start finding out some answers about the 2015 version of Bill Snyder’s team. Anything above eight could be asking a lot from Snyder and company.


J.J. in Tumalo, Oregon, writes: With its continuing squishy soft out of conference schedule do you agree that Baylor leaves itself no margin of error? A weak SOS will always justify the College Football Playoff Committee kicking Baylor to the curb and 0-2 in its last bowl games does not help the cause.

BC: I agree on both counts. The Bears have decided to minimize their margin of error with their stance on nonconference scheduling and bowl losses to Central Florida and Michigan State, with the nation watching, doesn’t help matters. None of this is something Art Briles' program can’t overcome, however. I don’t think many people would be shocked to see the Bears in the College Football Playoff in 2015 even though they aren’t maximizing their potential routes to the playoff.


Jamie in Austin, Texas, writes: Haven't we heard this song before? Texas Tech quarterback looks great early in his career, gets loads of hype, the fanbase gets super pumped for his prospects, and then… Kliff Kingsbury shuffles the deck and that QB doesn't even finish the season as the starter. Baker Mayfield, Davis Webb, now possibly Patrick Mahomes. Is it time that we pause before we start hyping Tech QBs up?

BC: Well, Jamie, I haven’t seen too many posters touting Mahomes as the Big 12 preseason offensive player of the year. He was extremely impressive to end his freshman season but I’d agree some folks on the fringe who need to take a step back before anointing him as the Big 12’s next elite passer. And when it comes to Kingsbury, I can’t blame him for tinkering with his quarterbacks -- neither Mayfield or Webb were taking care of the ball. Mahomes, in his short time, did a better job protecting the ball (16 TDs, 4 INTs) than either of those other two quarterbacks.


rtXC in Denison, Texas, writes: Are you guys as tired of the coaching carousel extending past signing day as the fans are? Here's my suggestion: move signing day to the first Wednesday of May. By that time, all NFL and NCAA staffs should be complete, with the players getting to see exactly what the new staff members bring to the table throughout spring practice and in the spring games. Gives players more time to sort things out, while giving new staffs more time to get things together. The first season of this change would provide an extra long recruiting cycle, but after that things would feel normal again, while protecting both parties, coaches and players alike. Thoughts?

BC: It’s an interesting idea but I don’t know that moving signing day to May really addresses the problem, which is the natural desire of coaches (or anyone for that matter) to progress in their careers. Coaches are going to leave during players/recruits careers, which is why prospects are repeatedly told to pick the school not the coach. Just because the coach would be there on a May signing day doesn’t mean they would be there five years down the road or even one year down the road. The only answer is players picking the best place/environment to excel, regardless of the coaches.


Cole in Oklahoma City writes: With Riley coming to OU and establishing a new offense, would you take the bet Joe Mixon has more total offense than Samaje Perine since Samaje is more of bruiser type back? And also given OU comes back to what they're known for, who wins the Big XII? My prediction is TCU, OU, Texas, Baylor, Ok St and so on. TCU and OU will probably be the Big XII title game.

BC: I’d bet on Mixon because he’s more versatile, allowing Riley to use him in so many different ways. I’d imagine we will see that duo on the field together plenty of times in 2015 -- both are too talented to waste on the sidelines. TCU and Baylor remain the clear favorites for me with Oklahoma State as the next candidate after that top two. OU has to prove themselves title ready before I'm willing to put them up there with TCU or Baylor.
It's Take Two Tuesday, and today we’re watching the throne. Big 12 co-champions Baylor and TCU have both begun spring practice and are already hard at work toward proving they deserve playoff-contender hype in 2015. Both have flaws and holes to address over the next month.

Brandon Chatmon and Max Olson debate which defending Big 12 champ will have more questions answered by the end of spring ball.

Brandon Chatmon: Baylor Bears

Baylor doesn’t have many questions to answer after back-to-back titles and increasing depth as each season goes by.

Obviously replacing Bryce Petty will be the talk of Waco as the quarterback battle between Seth Russell, Chris Johnson and Jarrett Stidham garners plenty of headlines. Russell is the favorite to win the job thanks to his experience in the system and success behind Petty in 2014. Either Johnson or Stidham will have to take the job away from the junior quarterback, meaning it’s possible Russell cements the job this spring. Either way, BU’s track record of stellar quarterback play under Art Briles makes this a mini question mark as opposed to the elephant-sized question marks at some of the other quarterback positions around the conference.

Receiver, linebacker and defensive back are the other potential question marks at Baylor with the departures of Antwan Goodley and Bryce Hager, along with BU’s secondary struggles at various times in 2014.

Yet the receiver position looks like it could be even stronger with KD Cannon poised to make a jump in Year 2, Corey Coleman showing he can be one of the Big 12’s top targets, and a meeting room full of elite but inexperienced receiving talent.

At linebacker, Taylor Young will look to build on a productive redshirt freshman campaign and will have Aiavion Edwards and Grant Campbell battling to help fill Hager’s void.

The bulk of BU’s starting lineup returns from last season, and the small questions facing Briles' team could have answers who saw time on the field for the Bears in 2014.

Max Olson: TCU Horned Frogs

There’s no disputing TCU has more players to replace this spring, and that means more uncertainty. Gary Patterson knows replacing six veteran starters on defense is no small task, and starting defensive end Mike Tuaua is out for the spring as well.

So what are the Frogs going to do? Entering their fourth year in the Big 12, they have the quality depth needed to solve these issues. Patterson and his newly promoted co-defensive coordinators will foster a next-man-up mentality this spring and push for competition.

And there will be lots of competition. At strong safety, Sam Carter’s replacement could be Denzel Johnson, Travin Howard or George Baltimore. At weak safety, Kenny Iloka is probably the favorite but will be pushed by redshirt freshman Ridwan Issahaku.

Then you’ve got Kevin White’s starting corner job, a battle that could play out a lot of different ways. You’ve got a former juco transfer (Corry O’Meally) competing with a touted true freshman (DeShawn Raymond), a converted receiver (Cameron Echols-Luper), a senior track star (Kolby Griffin), and youngsters Nick Orr and Torrance Mosley. Of all of TCU’s question marks, this is the competition I think is most likely to carry over to fall camp, though a pecking order will surely develop in spring ball.

And then there’s linebacker. Two new starters are needed, but that situation could be mostly figured out by the end of the spring. Between Sammy Douglas, Paul Whitmill, Ty Summers and the Frogs’ freshmen, Patterson seems excited about his options.

That’s a lot of names to keep up with, isn’t it? Still, I trust that Patterson knows what he’s working with and that this group can, in time, come close to playing to their predecessors’ standards. And fortunately, this team lost practically nothing -- just one starting lineman -- on offense. Having so few concerns on that side of the ball makes me far less concerned about TCU’s situation.

Big 12 morning links

March, 3, 2015
Mar 3
9:00
AM ET
Hilton Magic...
  • Iowa State is kicking off its spring drills this morning. Monday, coach Paul Rhoads met with the media to discuss his team. Among the topics was an update on defensive end Mitchell Meyer, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in February. Rhoads said Meyer has had two chemotherapy treatments, and his spirits are high.
  • The Cyclones also released a depth chart Monday, with few surprises. Perhaps the most intriguing position battle this spring will be at running back, where Iowa State is replacing Aaron Wimberly, who graduated, and DeVondrick Nealy, who left the team. Upperclassman Tyler Brown is atop the two-deep at running back, but the back creating the most buzz is redshirt freshman Mike Warren. "Mike is a guy we believe is going to be a 200-pound-plus back, which is where we want to be with our backs -- and where we haven't been in the past," Rhoads said. The Des Moines Register's Tommy Birch has more notes from Rhoads' news conference, including the plan for wideout Quenton Bundrage, who is coming back from a season-ending knee injury.
  • The Waco Tribune-Herald's John Werner has a feature on Baylor quarterback Seth Russell, who is the favorite to succeed Bryce Petty. Assuming Russell does win the job, it will be interesting to see how Art and Kendal Briles tailor the offense to fit Russell's skill set. Russell isn't a track star the way Robert Griffin III was. But he's more athletic than Petty, with a 40-yard dash time of 4.48 seconds. The Bears could be running the quarterback more next season than they have in recent years. In other news, the Bears had an interesting visitor to their practice Monday.
  • TCU coach Gary Patterson discussed his philosophy for hiring assistants with the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's Carlos Mendez. "So many people are so easy to let people go, to lose knowledge of your program, how you recruit," Patterson said. "I've never been someone to believe you do that." It's little wonder that Patterson promoted four of his coaches last week, including Chad Glasgow and DeMontie Cross to co-defensive coordinators. Patterson hasn't been afraid to go out and hire assistants from the outside when the occasion has called for it (see: Doug Meacham and Sonny Cumbie). But his philosophy of promoting from within has fostered TCU's coveted continuity.
  • The Tulsa World's Bill Haisten acknowledged the rumor that Oklahoma State quarterback Daxx Garman is exploring a transfer. Haisten noted there will be no official update on Garman from Oklahoma State until the start of its spring practice next week. But a source told me over the weekend that at this point it's a "strong possibility" Garman transfers. Though he has already transferred before (from Arizona to Oklahoma State), it's hard to fault Garman for at least considering this option. Though Garman started eight games last season, Mason Rudolph has established himself as the quarterback of the future in Stillwater. The Cowboys also have J.W. Walsh coming back, which has Garman staring at the prospect of falling to third string on the depth chart.

Big 12 coaching carousel recap

March, 2, 2015
Mar 2
4:00
PM ET
The coaching carousel has finally slowed to a stop (well, almost), so let’s take a look back at who has gone and who is new in the Big 12 heading into spring practice. Iowa State and Kansas State made no changes, but every other program in the conference is breaking in at least two new assistants this fall. A rundown of all the changes:

Baylor

Out: Philip Montgomery (Tulsa), Brian Norwood (Tulsa)
In: Promoted Kendal Briles (OC) and Tate Wallis (WRs), hired Cris Dishman (DBs)

Art Briles is handing the reins of Baylor's offense to his son, Kendal Briles, who had previously coached the Bears’ prolific receivers. He earned the promotion after Montgomery landed the head coaching job at Tulsa and brought Norwood along as his co-defensive coordinator. The younger Briles will now oversee quarterbacks and provide his own innovative touches to playcalling. Dishman, a former Pro Bowler, will also bring fresh ideas to the mix as the safeties coach.

Kansas

In: Hired David Beaty (HC), Rob Likens (OC), Reggie Mitchell (RBs), Klint Kubiak (WRs), Zach Yenser (OL), Gary Hyman (ST/TEs), Kenny Perry (co-DC), Calvin Thibodeaux (DL), Kevin Kane (LBs)

Beaty has been well-received by Kansas fans so far and assembled a staff that will compete on the recruiting trail. Retaining Clint Bowen as co-DC and assistant head coach was his first move and certainly a popular one. Likens and Yenser come from Cal and will help install Beaty’s Air Raid-style vision for the offense. Perry, a high school coach just three years ago, was plucked from TCU’s staff. Bringing back strength coach Je'Ney Jackson, a former Mark Mangino assistant, was another savvy move.

Oklahoma

Out: Josh Heupel (Utah State), Jay Norvell (Texas), Jerry Montgomery (Green Bay Packers), Bobby Jack Wright (retired)
In: Hired Lincoln Riley (OC), Dennis Simmons (WRs), Diron Reynolds (DL), Kerry Cooks (DBs)

Bob Stoops hated having to part ways with Heupel and Norvell, but a change of direction for the offense was necessary. Riley, a Mike Leach disciple who got the Air Raid rolling at East Carolina, seems like a great fit and the perfect guy to deliver on Stoops’ new plan. Simmons, another former Leach assistant, should help with the transition. Cooks was Notre Dame’s ace recruiter in Texas, and Reynolds has more than a decade of NFL coaching experience.

Oklahoma State

Out: Bob Connelly (USC), Jemal Singleton (Arkansas), Van Malone (SMU), Eric Wolford (San Francisco 49ers), Jason Ray
In: Hired Dan Hammerschmidt, Marcus Arroyo, Greg Adkins, Jason McEndoo

Gundy completed his staff last week after enduring a lot of change, including one coach (Wolford) taking an NFL job a week after being hired. The specific roles for OSU’s four new hires have yet to be announced. Hammerschmidt is taking a job on the defense, and the other three will work with the offense. Arroyo was the Tampa Bay Bucs’ interim offensive coordinator last season. Adkins also comes from the pros. McEndoo was a longtime assistant at FCS Montana State.

TCU

Out: Dick Bumpas (retired), Kenny Perry (Kansas)
In: Promoted DeMontie Cross (co-DC), Chad Glasgow (co-DC), Paul Gonzales (CBs), Dan Sharp (DL)

Gary Patterson stuck to promoting from within this offseason, rewarding Cross and Glasgow when Bumpas stepped aside after 11 years as a Frog. Gonzales was promoted after three years as a grad assistant. Sharp, a member of the staff since 2001, was a director of player personnel last season, but has long overseen TCU’s special teams. Patterson says every member of his staff was offered jobs this offseason, and all but one stay put. This much continuity after a big season is critical.

Texas

Out: Chris Rumph (Florida), Les Koenning, Bruce Chambers
In: Hired Brick Haley (DL), Jay Norvell (WRs), Jeff Traylor (ST/TEs)

The abrupt departure of the well-liked Rumph was a surprise, but Charlie Strong found a respected replacement in LSU’s Haley. Bringing in Norvell from the Sooners was a surprise, too, and adds a little extra juice to the rivalry. We’ll see what influence, if any, the former OC has on Texas’ plans to go up-tempo offensively. Traylor, a successful Texas high school coach, gives the Longhorns a better presence in recruiting the valuable East Texas area.

Texas Tech

Out: John Scott Jr. (New York Jets)
In: Hired David Gibbs (DC), Zac Spavital (LBs)

Nobody forced more turnovers over the past two seasons (73) than Houston. That is one of the many reasons why Gibbs was a smart hire to overhaul the Red Raiders' defense. The eighth Texas Tech DC since 2007 should bring a bit more stability, and he also brought along Spavital from Houston. Mike Smith, the interim DC last year, was retained and will now coach the defensive line in addition to keeping his co-DC title.

West Virginia

Out: Tom Bradley (UCLA), Shannon Dawson (Kentucky)
In: Hired Bruce Tall (DL)

Dawson and Bradley left for good promotions, yet it’s hard to say West Virginia took a big hit as a staff this offseason. Dawson’s departure won’t change much, as Dana Holgorsen is still overseeing the offense as its playcaller. New GA hire Michael Burchett will help Holgorsen coach the QBs. Tall returns after a four-year stint as DC at FCS Charlotte. Holgorsen still has one more hire to make: special teams coach. Once they are on board, the Big 12 coaching carousel will officially (probably) come to a stop for 2015.
We're in the middle of junior day season with multiple schools hosting prospects last weekend and others set to host elite talent this weekend. Here's the latest on the recruiting trail:

BAYLOR
Total commits: 5
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: Baylor hosted several elite prospects over the weekend including Plano (Texas) East prospect Anthony Hines III, an elite Class of 2017 prospect who boasts offers from most of the Big 12 as well as LSU, Ohio State and others. Fellow Class of 2017 prospects Hezekiah Jones and Jeff Okudah, who was offered over the weekend, were also in Waco for BU’s junior day as Art Briles' program focuses on this recruiting cycle and beyond.

IOWA STATE
Total commits: 0
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: It’s a big week for the Cyclones with spring football set to kick off and junior day this weekend. ISU also sent out some offers last week including an offer to Allen (Texas) defensive end Levi Onwuzurike. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound prospect also boasts offers from Boston College and Illinois.

KANSAS
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: KU held a junior day over the weekend with Wildwood (Missouri) Lafayette offensive lineman Chase Behrndt among the visitors. The Jayhawks also offered Sachse (Texas) athlete Donovan Duvernay last week. His twin brother, Devin Duvernay, is the No. 12 player in the ESPN Junior 300 and already boasted a KU offer. The Jayhawks joined Boise State as teams who have offered Donovan.

KANSAS STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: Edmond (Oklahoma) Santa Fe linebacker Calvin Bundage has emerged as one of the rising stars in the Big 12 region as he added an offer from the Wildcats. Iowa State, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, TCU, Texas Tech and Michigan are among the schools who have offered the Class of 2016 safety/linebacker hybrid.

OKLAHOMA
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 1
The latest: The Sooners could have a big weekend ahead with another junior day set for March 7. New Orleans (Louisiana) Easton linebacker Pernell Jefferson is among the recruits who are set to head to Norman, Oklahoma, this weekend. TCU and Texas Tech are among the other Big 12 teams who have offered Jefferson.

OKLAHOMA STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: Oklahoma State didn’t see any reason to wait any longer before offering Class of 2018 offensive tackle Brey Walker. The Moore (Oklahoma) Southmoore prospect is 6-foot-6, 285 pounds and excelled on the gridiron and wrestling mat during his freshman season. He’s going to be a name to watch over the next few years.

TCU
Total commits: 8
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: TCU hopes to go into Arkansas to grab Little Rock (Arkansas) Robinson athlete T.J. Hammonds away from the Razorbacks. The Horned Frogs offered the 5-foot-11, 186-pound prospect this week and he could be a good fit on either side of the ball for Gary Patterson’s program.

TEXAS
Total commits: 4
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: Texas held a junior day over the weekend with several top prospects visiting Austin, Texas, despite the weather playing havoc with the travel plans of many prospects. The Longhorns offered multiple prospects last week including OU offensive line commitment Jean Delance along with running back Darius Anderson and cornerback Eric Cuffee.

TEXAS TECH
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: The Red Raiders looked to the East Coast for one of its latest offers with Washington (D.C.) Woodrow Wilson running back Abdul Adams boasting an offer from Kliff Kingsbury’s program. The No. 277 player in the ESPN Junior 300, Adams has a large offer list which includes OU and West Virginia.

WEST VIRGINIA
Total commits: 4
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: West Virginia sent out multiple offers last week with its March 15 junior day on the horizon. Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) Imhotep running back Tylick Raynor and Southfield (Michigan) running back Matthew Falcon are among the recruits who boasted offers from the Mountaineers.
Baylor doesn't have many question marks along its depth chart this spring, but replacing the quarterback of its defense could be a challenge. A closer look at another key Big 12 spring position battle:

Departed: Bryce Hager is off to the NFL -- and made a big impression at the NFL combine -- after earning second-team All-Big 12 honors three straight years. He logged a total of 32 starts and 322 tackles during his time in Waco and provided critical production, consistency and leadership during the Bears' run to back-to-back Big 12 championships.

Spring contenders: Senior Grant Campbell, junior Aiavion Edwards, sophomore Raaquan Davis, sophomore Xavier Phillips, junior Kendall Ehrlich.

Summer contenders: Freshman Lenoy Jones Jr.

The skinny: This is shaping up to be a battle between two relatively veteran players. Edwards started five games last season at weakside linebacker before Taylor Young took over that spot. He enters his fourth year in the program with 55 career tackles (six for loss). Campbell's résumé is a bit lighter. He transferred from Bakersfield Community College last year and recorded 11 tackles as a reserve while getting accustomed to the speed of Baylor's play. Teammates say he's strong, fast, physical and ready to help this defense. Davis and Ehrlich played as reserves and on special teams last season, and we've yet to see what Phillips can do. Jones was a late get in recruiting who seems likely to redshirt.

Prediction: Edwards and Campbell are both qualified and well-suited to take over for Hager, and I wouldn't be surprised if they compete through spring ball and into fall camp for the job. The Bears need a know-it-all in the middle who can handle getting the defensive calls and getting his teammates lined up. Hager was practically an extra coach on the field. His successor will need to play at a high level right away. I like Campbell's chances, but I think both will end up earning starts this fall.

Spring primer: Baylor Bears

March, 2, 2015
Mar 2
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Baylor became the first Big 12 school to kick off spring ball, holding its first practice last week. Below is a preview of what to look for from the Bears during the rest of spring practice:

Offensive returner ready to take next step: KD Cannon was a freshman All-American last season, and one of only seven Big 12 wide receivers to surpass the 1,000-yard threshold. But his best ball is ahead of him. Cannon was often the third wheel in Baylor's passing attack behind Corey Coleman and Antwan Goodley. With Goodley gone, and with a season of experience behind him, Cannon figures to play a more prominent role as a sophomore in the Baylor offensive machine.

Defensive returner ready to take the next step: To win a national title in 2015, the Bears need a difference-maker to emerge in their secondary. Rising junior free safety Orion Stewart has a chance to be that difference-maker. Stewart led the Bears last season with four interceptions, and finished third with 82 tackles and seven pass-breakups. The Baylor secondary struggled mightily at times last season. If Stewart can become an All-Big 12-caliber performer, that will go a long way in stabilizing Phil Bennett's defensive backfield.

Redshirt freshman to watch: As if the Bears needed more big-play wideouts, Chris Platt and Ishmael Zamora, both four-star parts of Baylor's sterling 2014 wide receiver class, have already been turning heads this spring. Platt, a three-time state track champion in the quarter mile, brings playmaking speed to the slot. Zamora, at 6-foot-4, has the size to win jump balls downfield (watch this catch). Baylor was already going to be loaded at receiver with Coleman, Cannon and veteran Jay Lee. But Zamora and Platt have the opportunity to be Baylor's next wave at the position.

Most significant position battle: After backing up Bryce Petty the past two seasons, fourth-year junior Seth Russell has been getting first-team reps at quarterback this spring. But he hasn't won the job yet. Russell first must fend off sophomore Chris Johnson and hotshot freshman Jarrett Stidham, who is with the squad this spring. Russell is a big-time athlete with loads of potential. Before he becomes Baylor's next great quarterback, he has to prove his competitive mettle this spring.

Key midterm enrollee: Whether he wins the starting job now or later, Stidham is a big-time talent. The top Big 12 quarterback signee didn't flip his commitment from Texas Tech to Baylor and still enroll early so that he could redshirt this season, either. Coach Art Briles has said that Russell will "have to be beat out." Though that won't be easy, Stidham has the skill set to do it.

Question that could be answered: Stidham is intriguing, but it's very possible Russell ends Baylor's quarterback battle before the end of the spring. The Bears have enjoyed enviable quarterback stability during the Briles era. Provided Russell performs up to his potential this spring, the Bears might end the suspense and name him the starter.

Question that won’t be answered until fall: Four times last season, the Bears gave up more than 40 points and more than 300 yards passing. For a team with playoff aspirations, that won't cut it. With basically the entire unit back, the Baylor secondary has a chance to be better than it was in 2014. But that won't be revealed until it's tested in the fall.
Fully capitalizing on red-zone chances is a trait of championship teams.

Settling for field goals can cost a team a game. Worst yet, turning the ball over in the opponent's red zone can completely change momentum.

Here's a look at the Big 12's rankings in red-zone efficiency in conference games only during the past three years since TCU and West Virginia joined in 2012.

Red-zone points per drive

1. Kansas State, 5.14: The Wildcats' 64.3 red-zone touchdown percentage is the best in the Big 12. Five Wildcats (John Hubert, Collin Klein, Charles Jones, Jake Waters, Daniel Sams) rushed for at least seven red-zone touchdowns.

2. Oklahoma, 5.02: The Sooners average 3.1 yards per carry in the red zone, ranking second in the Big 12. Samaje Perine rushed for 240 yards and 14 touchdowns on 56 red-zone carries in 2014 as he erased any need for a special short yardage package for the Sooners.

3. Baylor, 4.94: The Bears have the unique ability to run defenses ragged with their speed and explosiveness yet buckle down with physical offense when needed. Baylor's 75 red-zone rushing touchdowns are the Big 12's best during this span.

4 (tied). Texas, 4.92: The Longhorns convert 50.7 percent of third-down conversions in the red zone, second in the conference but Texas' 282 total plays and 106 total drives rank eighth in the Big 12 -- a sign UT doesn't sustain long scoring drives on a consistent basis.

4 (tied). Oklahoma State, 4.92: The Cowboys scored on 85.3 percent of their red-zone drives, but a 34.8 third-down conversion rate ranked last in the Big 12. Some of OSU's offensive struggles in recent years followed them into the red zone at times.

6. Iowa State, 4.90: The Cyclones' 3.79 yards per play in the red zone sits atop the Big 12 but their 236 total red-zone plays is ninth in the conference. Paul Rhoads' team was decent when it got inside the 20-yard line but a combination of turnovers and inefficiency slowed ISU down.

7. Texas Tech, 4.79: The Red Raiders' eight red-zone turnovers helped push them down the rankings despite Tech recording a conference-best 61.9 completion percentage inside the red zone.

8. West Virginia, 4.76: The Mountaineers had a 29 touchdown-to-interception ratio in the red zone with one interception in 115 red zone attempts but their 34.9 third-down conversion percentage resulted a poor red-zone touchdown percentage (58.9 percent, eighth in Big 12).

9. TCU, 4.59: The Horned Frogs nine red-zone turnovers were the worst in the Big 12, offsetting TCU's 55.9 completion percentage and 4.88 yards per pass attempt in the red zone, which ranked second in the Big 12 in both categories.

10. Kansas, 3.72: The Jayhawks rank last in pretty much every category including yards per play (2.6), total plays (202) and yards per carry (2.14). Kansas' bad offense followed them any time they ventured within the red zone.

Red-zone points per drive allowed

1. TCU, 4.25: Gary Patterson's program sits atop the Big 12 in total plays (229), yards per play (2.85) and yards per carry (2.39) in the red zone.

2. Oklahoma State, 4.43: The Cowboys allowed 1.98 yards per carry in the red zone and nine red-zone sacks, ranking first in the Big 12, and tied TCU for first at 2.85 yards per play.

3 (tied). Kansas State, 4.64: The Wildcats were terrific on third down, allowing 35.8 percent of conversion attempts to be converted.

3 (tied). Kansas, 4.64: Kansas saw the most total plays (369) yet ranked third behind OSU and TCU in yards per play (3.08). The Jayhawks' defense also added nine red-zone turnovers forced, which is second in the conference.

5. Texas, 4.66: The Longhorns' 8.1 sack percentage in the red zone led the conference, but 33.2 percent of opponents' plays resulted in five yards or more, the worst percentage in the Big 12. It gave the defense a boom-or-bust type of feel.

6. West Virginia, 4.75: The Mountaineers faced the second-highest number of red-zone plays (364) and ranked fourth in yards per play allowed (3.17) yet allowed opponents to convert 50.6 of third-down attempts.

7. Iowa State, 4.82: The Cyclones have forced the most red-zone turnovers in the Big 12 (11) yet have allowed 80 red-zone touchdowns, tied with Kansas for eighth.

8. Oklahoma, 5.06: The Sooners' inability to force turnovers in the red zone is part of the problem as OU forced one red-zone mistake in three seasons.

9. Baylor, 5.39: Baylor's 3.58 yards per play ranked ninth in the conference and didn't record a red-zone sack in three seasons.

10. Texas Tech, 5.42: The Red Raiders allowed a 57.1 third-down conversion rate, worst in the Big 12. By comparison, TCU's 20 third-down conversion rate was the Big 12's best.

Big 12 morning links

February, 27, 2015
Feb 27
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The dress is white and gold. And it's ugly. There, I said it. On to the links...
  • Mike Gundy is a fast shopper. The Oklahoma State coach filled all of his coaching staff vacancies on Thursday night, hiring three assistants and bringing on two analysts who were former OSU assistants. Marcus Arroyo is perhaps the most intriguing new hire, as he was the Tampa Bay Bucs' interim OC last season. His duties at OSU have yet to be defined. Gundy went with two coaches from the NFL and one from FCS, so it'll be interesting to see what they bring to the table as recruiters in this conference.
  • Gary Patterson is expecting a "baptism by fire" for the young TCU defenders competing for starting jobs this spring. With six starters gone and Mike Tuaua out for the spring, the Frogs' D is going to be filled with fresh faces over the course of its 15 spring practices, which begin Saturday. We've addressed their holes at linebacker on the blog this week, but take note of the battles in their secondary. Lot of candidates and a lot of competition coming soon.
  • David Gibbs understands why his Texas Tech defensive staff looks a little "screwy" (his words) on paper, but the new Texas Tech defensive coordinator likes who he's working with. Most of Tech's defensive assistants have been displaced in that they aren't coaching their usual position, but Gibbs makes a compelling case for why that's an overrated concern. Good coaches are good coaches no matter what they're coaching, he says. I like his confidence.
  • Baylor agreeing to future nonconference games against Louisiana Tech and FCS Abilene Christian is evoking the predictable "cupcake" criticism, just as expected. Which is probably a tad disrespectful to La. Tech, a nine-win program in 2014. Evidently Baylor fans aren't happy about these games either, which I kind of don't get. Ian McCaw is merely acting on Art Briles' philosophy for scheduling, and Briles' philosophy has led to a 16-2 record in Big 12 games of the last two seasons. McCaw and Briles aren't convinced the nonconference games hurt their playoff chances, so their plans aren't going to change.
  • You knew Kevin White's performance at the NFL combine was going to help his stock and probably put him firmly in the top-10 conversations. I wasn't sure he'd move up this much. The West Virginia star has moved up to the No. 4 spot in Todd McShay's Mock Draft 3.0. Insider That pick belongs to the Oakland Raiders, who could face a heck of a dilemma between White and Amari Cooper. Malcom Brown, Dorial Green-Beckham and Jordan Phillips made McShay's mock as well.
Last week, we completed a series ranking the individual position groups in the Big 12 heading into spring ball. We also weighed in with who we thought the best position units in the Big 12 are.

Now, we put to the question to you.

Who has the best individual position group (not including quarterback) in the league?

SportsNation

Who has the Big 12s best individual position group?

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    22%
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    1%
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    40%
  •  
    8%
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    29%

Discuss (Total votes: 4,417)

Despite losing Antwan Goodley off last year's team, the Baylor wide receivers are certainly in the conversation. All-Big 12 selection Corey Coleman and freshman All-American K.D. Cannon both return coming off 1,000-yard receiving seasons and form one the most prolific one-two punches at wideout in college football. The group has depth, too, with veteran Jay Lee, sophomore Davion Hall and a host of up-and-coming prospects including Ishmael Zamora, Chris Platt, Devontre Stricklin and Blake Lynch.

Receiver isn't Baylor's only stocked position, either. The Bears also bring back a devastating defensive line, headlined by a pair of first-team All-Big 12 performers in defensive end Shawn Oakman and defensive tackle Andrew Billings. Together, the two combined for 30 tackles for loss last season -- the highest total among defensive line teammates in the Big 12. Tackle Beau Blackshear is also entering his third season as a starter for the Bears.

Baylor, however, isn't the only Big 12 team with a loaded position.

Samaje Perine is back to lead an Oklahoma running back stable loaded with talent. As a true freshman, Perine led the Big 12 with more than 1,700 yards on the ground and 21 touchdowns. He also broke the FBS single-game record with 427 rushing yards against Kansas. Perine is flanked with plenty of talent in the Sooners backfield. Alex Ross led the Big 12 in kick returns last season and averaged 6.8 yards per carry as a change of pace to Perine's barreling style. Keith Ford has 94 career carries. And the Sooners will finally debut Joe Mixon, who was the gem of the 2014 signing class before being suspended for the season.

While Oklahoma will lean on the firepower of its backfield, West Virginia will be relying on a secondary overflowing with talent. Strong safety Karl Joseph, who has forged a reputation as the league's hardest hitter, will be entering his fourth year as a starter. He could emerge as a Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year candidate. Dravon Henry is coming off a freshman All-American campaign after starting every game at free safety during his season in Morgantown. Daryl Worley is one of the top returning cornerbacks in the league. And West Virginia signed two more would-be contributors in ESPN 300 defensive back Tyrek Cole and ESPN 50 JC corner Rasul Douglas.

Lastly, we'd be remiss if we didn't include a position group from early Big 12 2015 favorite TCU. The Horned Frogs are obviously strong at several positions. But for the purpose of this exercise, we'll actually feature their special teams units. All-Big 12 kicker Jaden Oberkrom will be a four-year starter. Punter Ethan Perry will be a four-year starter, as well. Cameron Echols-Luper is back after ranking 16th in the country in punt returns. The Horned Frogs have several players with kickoff return experience. And, not only did they lead the country in punt return coverage last year, they became the first team to allow negative punt return yards in the 14 seasons the statistic has been tracked. The TCU special teams have no weaknesses.

Now, it's your to weigh in.

Tell us who you think the best individual position group in the Big 12 is by voting in our weekly Big 12 poll.

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