Adrian Peterson isn't predicting a big day

November, 27, 2013
11/27/13
4:24
PM ET
LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson declined to make predictions about what he might do to Chicago’s 32nd-ranked run defense Sunday at the Metrodome.

But if someone as innocuous as St. Louis’ Benny Cunningham could rip the Bears for 109 yards last week, Peterson could be in for a field day against a Bears defense allowing an average of 145.2 yards per game.

“I don’t know,” Peterson said, laughing. “I don’t really want to sit here and make any predictions. I just want to contribute and do whatever it takes to help my team win. So if that’s 300 yards, perfect. If that’s 150, perfect; 50, with 100-something receiving, any way I can help my team get this “W” this weekend, that’s pretty much all I’m worried about. I’m just going to go out there and play ball and let the chips fall where they may.”

[+] EnlargeAdrian Peterson
Otto Greule Jr/Getty ImagesAdrian Peterson has averaged 107.7 yards per game in his career against the Bears.
Peterson produced his first 100-yard game since Nov. 3 last week against the Green Bay Packers, and even Bears players such as cornerback Zack Bowman admitted that once the running back sees tape of Chicago’s performance against the Rams, he’ll see “that he can have a big day against us.”

“They’re going to go back and watch the Rams game,” Bowman said.

Why wouldn’t they? After all, the Bears surrendered 258 yards on the ground against the Rams, which averaged 8.9 yards per attempt. Cunningham, Zac Stacy, and Tavon Austin averaged 8.4, 7.3 and 65 yards, respectively, on 26 attempts, with each breaking loose for gains of 27 yards or more.

Against the Rams, the Bears allowed eight runs for gains of 10 yards or more. On the season, the Bears have given up 48 such runs, including 10 for gains of 25 yards or more.

“[We’re] looking to rebound from a very disappointing outing, especially in the run game on Sunday,” Bears defensive coordinator Mel Tucker said. “In order to play great defense, especially run defense, everyone needs to be exactly where they need to be on every play. It only takes one breakdown to cause a big play. We really don’t have margin for error, especially when you’re playing good teams with good talent. Everyone has to be on point.”

That especially holds true for Sunday’s matchup against Peterson, who gained 100 yards against a healthy Chicago defense in the first meeting between the teams before injuries decimated the unit.

Peterson has hit the century mark in four games this season, and his 98.5 yards per game over his seven seasons rank as No. 3 in league history for players participating in a minimum of 100 games. Peterson admits to taking some pride in maintaining such productivity against defenses loading the box seemingly every week to stop him.

“It feels good, but then it feels like just another play because I’ve been dealing with it for so long,” Peterson said. “For seven years, every time we play, guys are in there to stop the run. So it’s become a norm.”

It’s also becoming fairly common for Chicago’s defense to surrender yardage in chunks on the ground. But Peterson refuses to underestimate the Bears. Peterson said the Bears are “not the defense we played earlier this season,” with the unit “going through a little funk right now.”

But the running back isn’t quite on the same tear as he was in 2012 when he finished the season with 2,097 yards. With 997 yards so far, Peterson needs 154 yards against the Bears on Sunday to become just the fifth player in league history to hit 10,000 yards or more rushing in their first seven seasons.

Given Chicago’s epic struggles against the run, Peterson was asked if he predicted a 300-yard outing against the Bears.

“Don’t make that the headline,” he said, laughing.

Peterson may be able to do that himself.

“Well, we take a lot of pride in being able to run the ball,” Vikings coach Leslie Frazier said. “We go into every ballgame with the intent of being able to run the ball. We feel like we’ve got the best running back in the NFL on our team. So we’re going to try to play to our strength.”

In 11 career games against Chicago, Peterson has averaged 107.7 yards, which ranks as the most by any player all-time against the Bears. Peterson gained more than 120 yards in four of those contests, including a 224-yard explosion during the running back’s rookie year.

“His will and determination is so apparent on every single run,” Bears coach Marc Trestman said. “It’s his will, his determination, the things that go beyond his ability that really stand out to me. Certainly, there are guys who do just as much, but nobody more than Adrian Peterson. We’ve seen a lot of running backs come and go. He’s certainly one of the greatest to ever play the game. Some of us have seen a lot of running backs over the last 50 years in the National Football League, and he has to be one of the best.”

Michael C. Wright

ESPN Chicago Bears reporter

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