Cowboys have to let Josh Brent go

June, 27, 2013
6/27/13
3:32
PM ET


IRVING, Texas -- A second failed marijuana test has landed Josh Brent back in jail, six months after a car driven by the Dallas Cowboys defensive tackle cost the life of teammate and friend Jerry Brown.

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Galloway and Company discuss Josh Brent's second failed drug test and how the Cowboys should handle the situation.

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Immediately following Wednesday's arrest of Aaron Hernandez came a lot of hand-wringing about New England’s decisive action to release him, and the Cowboys’ decision to hold on to Brent and let the legal process play out.

Two lives have been lost, but that’s where the similarities end. According to the assistant district attorney, Hernandez allegedly orchestrated the execution of Odin Lloyd. The result of Brent’s actions came about because of stupidity, negligence and hubris.

After releasing Hernandez, the Patriots issued a statement expressing sympathy to the Lloyd family, ending it with: “At this time, we believe this transaction is simply the right thing to do.”

And that’s how the Cowboys should feel now regarding Brent.

PODCAST
ESPN NFL analyst Ed Werder joins the show to talk about the Aaron Hernandez arrest and arraignment and the Patriots' decision to let Hernandez go.

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They tried to do the right thing. They supported him at the request of Brown’s mother. Brent went to the facility to receive treatment for his injuries, and when the offseason began, he was allowed to work out.

The Cowboys kept Brent as close to the team as possible, even though he never took the field in an offseason practice. They have waited for the legal system to do its job. They have waited for the NFL to penalize Brent under its personal conduct policy.

And now Brent has repaid the team’s patience by failing a second drug test. How can the Cowboys ever trust him again?

On the field, Brent has shown he can be a productive player. A great player? No. Solid? Sure. And that’s part of the reason why they kept him around, while in 2003, they cut Dwayne Goodrich about five weeks after his car accident, in which two men were killed.

They knew Goodrich could not play, so it was almost easier to get rid of him, especially with Bill Parcells on board as coach.

Brent one day may play again in the NFL, but he should never wear a Cowboys uniform again.

A large sign outside the Valley Ranch locker room reads: It is a privilege -- not a right -- to play and coach for the Dallas Cowboys.

Some of you may believe Brent lost that privilege the night Brown died, but there can be no doubt that he has lost that privilege now.

It’s time for the Cowboys to part ways with Brent.

It’s simply the right thing to do.

Todd Archer

ESPN Dallas Cowboys reporter

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