Pac-12: Washington Huskies

Last week your humble Pac-12 Blog broke down the 2015 Pac-12 recruiting class and where those players came from. But those kinds of numbers always prompt more questions like: OK, this is one class, what about the last two classes? The last three? What about every class that each Pac-12 coach has signed?

Well, your humble Pac-12 Blog is back. And it's back with those answers (with signees by state).

ARIZONA WILDCATS:
Rich Rodriguez, four classes -- 98 signees, 11 ESPN 300 members
  • California: 41
  • Arizona: 16
  • Texas: 9
  • Florida: 7
  • Louisiana: 5
  • Colorado: 3
  • Two signees: Georgia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia
  • One signee: Canada, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington
ARIZONA STATE SUN DEVILS:
Todd Graham, four classes -- 100 signees, seven ESPN 300 members
  • California: 46
  • Arizona: 17
  • Florida: 7
  • Louisiana: 6
  • Three signees: Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas
  • Two signees: Nevada, Washington, Washington D.C.
  • One signee: Canada, Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, New York, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah
CALIFORNIA BEARS:

Sonny Dykes, three classes -- 71 signees, four ESPN 300 members
  • California: 49
  • Texas: 6
  • Three signees: Arizona, Washington
  • Two signees: Hawaii, Mississippi, Oregon
  • One signee: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana
COLORADO BUFFALOES:

Mike MacIntyre, three classes -- 66 signees, no ESPN 300 members
  • California: 33
  • Colorado: 14
  • Texas: 8
  • Arizona: 3
  • Two signees: Hawaii, Utah
  • One signee: Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, Washington
OREGON DUCKS:

Mark Helfrich, three classes -- 63 signees, 17 ESPN 300 members
  • California: 26
  • Oregon: 5
  • Four signees: Arizona, Texas, Washington
  • Three signees: Florida, Georgia, Hawaii
  • Two signees: Louisiana, Nevada
  • One signee: Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee
OREGON STATE BEAVERS:

Gary Andersen, one class -- 22 signees, no ESPN 300 members
  • Utah: 6
  • Four signees: California, Florida
  • Two signees: Oregon, Texas
  • One signee: American Samoa, Arizona, Hawaii, Louisiana
STANFORD CARDINAL:

David Shaw, five classes -- 95 signees, 26 ESPN 300 members
  • California: 25
  • Georgia: 7
  • Six signees: Arizona, Florida, Texas
  • Five signees: Utah, Washington
  • Four signees: Louisiana
  • Three signees: North Carolina
  • Two signees: Colorado, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia
  • One signee: Hawaii, Indiana, Idaho, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Washington D.C.
UCLA BRUINS:

Jim Mora, four classes -- 92 signees, 31 ESPN 300 members
  • California: 55
  • Texas: 10
  • Arizona: 5
  • Three signees: Florida, Georgia, Hawaii
  • Two signees: Delaware
  • One signee: Colorado, Connecticut, Indiana, Louisiana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, Washington
USC TROJANS:

Steve Sarkisian, two classes -- 43 signees, 25 ESPN 300 members
  • California: 32
  • Texas: 3
  • Two signees: Florida, Utah
  • One signee: Georgia, Idaho, Nevada, Oklahoma
UTAH UTES:

Kyle Whittingham, five classes* -- 108 signees, 0 ESPN 300 members
  • California: 40
  • Utah: 29
  • Texas: 15
  • Florida: 8
  • Louisiana: 6
  • Nevada: 3
  • Two signees: Arizona, Hawaii
  • One signee: Maryland, New Jersey, New York

*This is only counting Whittingham's classes that he recruited into the Pac-12 conference (so, starting with the 2011 signing class since the Utes made it official on June 22, 2010).

WASHINGTON HUSKIES:

Chris Petersen, two classes -- 49 signees, 4 ESPN 300 members
  • California: 28
  • Washington: 14
  • Idaho: 2
  • One signee: Maryland, Montana, Oregon, Texas, Wyoming
WASHINGTON STATE COUGARS:

Mike Leach, four classes -- 102 signees, one ESPN 300 members
  • California: 57
  • Washington: 14
  • American Samoa: 7
  • Three signees: Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, Texas
  • Two signees: Alabama, Georgia
  • One signee: Colorado, Delaware, Louisiana, Maryland, Montana, Oregon, Oklahoma, Utah
NOTES/OBSERVATIONS:

There are 20 states from which no current Pac-12 South coach has ever signed a player, and 18 from which no current North coaches have never signed a player. Of those states, 11 are overlapping, meaning that no player from the following states has been signed to a current Pac-12 coach during his tenure as head coach -- Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

It's not surprising that no players has been signed from Wyoming, Vermont, Alaska or North Dakota because those are the four least-populated states in the U.S. What is surprising is that only three players have been signed from the state of Alabama -- two to Mike Leach and one to Sonny Dykes.

Long story short: If you're a high school prospect and you want to play in the Pac-12, it doesn't hurt to live in California, Florida or Texas (if you live outside of "Pac-12 territory"). If you're a high school prospect and you live in Wisconsin or West Virginia -- even though some of these coaches have been head coaches in those states, your chances don't look good at all.

Eleven of the 12 programs have signed the most players from the state of California during current coaches' tenures. The only coach who hasn't is Oregon State coach Gary Andersen, but California is tied for second-most on his list.

North coaches have signed -- on average -- three classes per coach while the South coaches have signed -- on average -- four per. While it's really only a difference of one class, it is a difference of 20-30 student athletes per coach, so really the possibility of 120-180 different home states.

In the South the most recruited states outside of California and home states -- as a whole -- are Florida and Texas. Again, this might not be surprising considering how talent-rich both of those states are, but the only Pac-12 South coach who has ever coached in one of those states is Todd Graham (Rice).

In the North, it's a bit more of a mash-up. The states of Arizona and Washington are big for Cal and Oregon. Florida is big for Oregon State and Stanford. Chris Petersen really hasn't had to reach out of California or Washington, much like his in-state foe, Mike Leach. However, Leach also likes to go to American Samoa, where he has signed seven players.

USC has had the most success with the top recruits. Fifty-eight percent of Sarkisian's recruits are ESPN 300 members. After him, the next most "successful" recruiting coaches are Mora (33.7 percent), Shaw (31.6 percent) and Helfrich (27 percent).

Signing top recruits certainly gives teams a boost on the field as evidenced by the teams above and the successes they've had under each coach. But look at Utah. Whittingham hasn't signed a single ESPN 300 player and yet his team was in the hunt for the South title last season. It's the same with Rich Rodriguez: Even though just 7 percent of his players have been ESPN 300 members, he has still had major success on the field for the Wildcats.
There isn’t a Pac-12 defense that will need to replace more major contributors than Washington.

The entire defensive front of Danny Shelton, Hau'oli Kikaha, Andrew Hudson and Evan Hudson is gone. So are Paul Hornung Award winner Shaq Thompson and John Timu, who led the Huskies in tackles during two of the four seasons he started. Washington assistant coach/linebackers coach Bob Gregory has his work cut out.

“Well, that’s college football,” Gregory said. “It’s never approached that there’s a problem. It’s just, ‘Hey, we’re moving on, that’s just the way it is.’ You’ve got pro football where you might have guys for a long time but [here] you’re going to graduate guys every single year.”

[+] EnlargeShaq Thompson
Otto Greule Jr/Getty ImagesWashington is losing its entire defensive front as well as star linebacker Shaq Thompson.
But they’re not just replacing “guys.” They’re replacing their front four, and more specifically for Gregory they’re replacing two of the best inside linebackers that Washington has seen in a while.

Thus far the eventual heirs to the thrones look like the 2014 backups -- Keishawn Bierria for Thompson and Scott Lawyer or maybe Azeem Victor for Timu.

Bierria started four games in 2014, including picking up starts during the two games that Thompson moved over to tailback. Gregory said Bierria could be joined in the competition by outside linebackers Travis Feeney and Cory Littleton as the Huskies search for that perfect match of productivity and playmaking ability, but in Bierria’s limited time this season Gregory was impressed with his natural instinct and how he “made plays when we needed to make some plays.”

“He’s got a chance to be a good football player,” Gregory said. “Hopefully sooner rather than later."

Gregory is also hoping that Lawyer or Victor proves himself as a starter sooner rather than later. Lawyer has the upper hand when it comes to experience, Gregory noted, but he also said he sees great potential in Victor, who redshirted last season.

But the common thread to all of these guys is this: Everyone is going to be relatively inexperienced and everyone is going to be replacing someone who was far from that.

Which brings up the topic that Gregory will have to bridge this season -- balancing the expectations of the players who fill these shoes in the fact that maybe they don’t need to be filled in the exact same way as the player who came before them.

There seems to be an art in this transition and Washington won’t be the only Pac-12 team that has to face this issue. Gary Andersen and Mark Helfrich both need to replace recording-breaking quarterbacks. Kyle Whittingham needs to replace the conference leader in sacks. Steve Sarkisian needs to replace a 100-yard-per-game rusher. And all of the conference players who step into these roles will be younger, less-experienced players.

Does Gregory expect Bierria to score four defensive touchdowns next season? Does Gregory expect Lawyer or Victor to come in and register a 100-plus tackles in his first year starting?

No. But Gregory has seen it done at each of those positions so he knows that it is possible.

“These kids are competitors and they have very high expectations,” Gregory said. “But, it’s all about them, it’s all about you as a player developing. We don’t want them to think they need to be Shaq, we just want whoever it is to be themselves and to develop and be consistent players and play hard -- but all within themselves.”

Interior expectations aren’t the only thing Gregory needs to balance. He knows that in year two of the Chris Petersen tenure, there will be higher expectations from the administration and the public and within the coaches themselves -- all of this after losing so much on defense.

“It’s another year, the expectations are going to be a little bit higher,” Gregory said. “On the flipside, we’re going to have a lot of new faces on the defense. … We want to push the players as much as we can, but we have to bring those players along at a good pace and slowly so they can get it.”

Luckily for Gregory, all of these guys are on campus right now -- Washington isn’t relying on any true freshmen who won’t get to campus until June or July. And what each of these players is missing -- experience -- is only going to be found on the field.

Washington kicks off spring football on March 30.

“Now the challenge is the next guy up and we’ve got to develop those kids and bring them along at a fast pace,” Gregory said. “You go through winter conditioning and you hope you get better; you go through spring football and you hope you get better; then it’s summer. You hope all these phases of the offseason you want those guys to continue to improve.”
Washington finished 8-6 in Chris Petersen's first season this fall and more than a few Huskies fans were pretty grumpy about it. They expected more.

Now, you could make an argument they were right to be irritated. The Huskies had a lot of talent, particularly on defense, and Petersen's reputation when he was lured away from Boise State was that he got more out of his team's talent, not less.

Or you could make an argument that eight victories -- even in a 14-game season -- is pretty darn good for a program that has averaged just 5.42 wins over the past 14 years and has won more than eight games just once during that span (2013).

Yet whether you are a grumpy, hopeful or resigned Huskies fan, we bring you tidings of great joy. Washington will rise again. We, the perspicacious team known as the "Pac-12 blog," view the Huskies as the Pac-12 program with the most upside from its present state.

Why? More than a few reasons.

Washington has not only been elite before, it's an all-time top-25 program. It won the 1991 national title and has won 15 conference championships. When we mention those 14 years of averaging 5.42 wins, we make a cutoff after the Huskies' 2000 season, in which they won the Rose Bowl, finished 11-1 and ranked No. 3 in the country. From 1980 to 2000, the Huskies won seven Pac-10 championships.

Of course, the Huskies' good friends in Eugene, Oregon, those low-key, humble Ducks, are politely raising their hands and gently protesting, "With all due respect ... live in the past much?"

Ah, but there are plenty of reasons for optimism, which Huskies fans can share, perhaps after asking Oregon fans if they'd like to know what it's like to actually win a national title.

For one, Husky Stadium might be the Pac-12's best stadium. Heck, it might be among the nation's best venues since its $280 million renovation that was completed before the 2013 season. It's on campus, it's big -- seating 70,000 -- and its location on Lake Washington with fantastic views of the snow-capped Cascade Mountains is postcard worthy.

It won't be difficult for Petersen to recruit to that stadium, which ranked third in the Pac-12 in attendance this fall at 64,508. Further, it is just the centerpiece of a program with A-list facilities.

Finally, we are certainly not even close to changing our "buy" rating on Petersen after one middling year, pretty much the only middling year of his career, and the first year in which he was a head coach in unfamiliar surroundings. Here's a guess his list of "What I Learned in My First Pac-12 Season" is fairly lengthy.

Unfortunately for our desire to be immediately right with this projection, the Huskies might, in fact, take a step back next season, despite the North Division looking wide-open after Oregon. Washington is replacing just about every defensive playmaker and its offense has even more questions, starting at quarterback but including a rebuilding offensive line.

Still, in terms of its long-term prospects, we're betting on Petersen to shortly push Washington back into the Pac-12 and national hunt.
Players come and go.

In a perfect world, teams only have to reload, not rebuild. But following this season, there are a lot of shoes that need to be filled due to early departures and expected graduations.

That leaves the question: Will these spots be reloading or rebuilding? Your humble Pac-12 blog takes a look at some of the biggest shoes that need to be filled entering the 2015 season.

Washington Huskies

Biggest shoes: Shaq Thompson

Washington’s all-everything man has departed Seattle and will likely be finding his new home sometime during the two days of the NFL draft. But what he leaves behind is not just a pair of big shoes but several pairs of big shoes. As a linebacker he was the team’s third-leading tackler (81) but No. 1 playmaker. Whenever there was a big defensive play, Thompson was in or around the action. He registered one interception (returned for a score) and two forced fumbles this season. But it’s not just a linebacker the Huskies will need to replace -- they’ll also need someone to pick up his slack at running back. Thompson carried the ball 61 times for 456 yards (a team-leading 7.5 yards per carry). He only averaged 32.6 yards per game but it was a meaningful 32.6 yards per game and it was picked up in big chunks.

Stepping in: A player as athletic as Thompson (also, as evidenced by UCLA’s Jack Myles) who can play both ways as efficiently as he did only comes along once in a great while. So, the Huskies will need multiple players to step into Thompson’s shoes.

Defensively: Keishawn Bierria

Bierria has been studying under Thompson the past two seasons, redshirting his freshman year and being Thompson’s primary backup this past season. He did start four games for the Huskies and proved that he had big-game, big-play ability after registering a team-high 10 tackles against UCLA.

Offensively: The Huskies worked with a running back-by-committee approach this season. And it worked -- Washington finished fourth in the conference in rushing (188.6 yards per game). There will certainly still be competition at the running back position and no one should rule out a featured back in that offense, but as of now it just looks like the committee will shrink a bit as both Dwayne Washington and Lavon Coleman return to the Huskies. Rather than a new face stepping in and picking up those extra carries, just look for those two to get more carries throughout the game.

Down the road? Keep an eye out for 2015 signee Austin Joyner. The 5-foot-10, 192-pound dual-threat player was named Washington’s Defensive Player of the Year by the Seattle Times but also rushed for 32 touchdowns and 1,768 yards on just 133 carries during his senior season -- that’s 13.4 yards per carry and a touchdown every four times he carried the ball. Could he be a two-way threat down the road? Maybe.
The NFL Combine kicks off on Friday.

Here’s a breakdown of which Pac-12 players will be appearing on which days.

FRIDAY, FEB. 20 | Specialists, offensive linemen, tight ends

Offensive linemen:
Tight ends: SATURDAY, FEB. 21 | Quarterbacks, running backs, wide receivers

Quarterbacks:
Running backs:
Wide receivers: SUNDAY, FEB. 22 | Defensive linemen, linebackers

Defensive linemen:
Linebackers: MONDAY, FEB. 23 | Defensive backs
Signing day has come and gone and with it an entirely new batch of Pac-12 players is joining the conference (269 players, to be exact).

With the Pac-12 gaining more national recognition, it’s no surprise to see the recruiting trends heading further outside of what was typically considered “Pac-12 territory.”

For example, the most heavily recruited area was -- unsurprisingly -- the West Coast and states that are the home to one or more Pac-12 programs. But right after that, the next-biggest target was the South and Southeast: SEC territory. The Pac-12 signed the same number of recruits from Texas as it did Arizona. Louisiana was a big state for the conference as well -- Pac-12 schools signed 13 players from the Bayou State.

Here’s a closer look at where exactly the conference picked up its Class of 2015 talent:
Observations:

  • One obvious note is the number of players from California -- players from the Golden State account for 48 percent of Pac-12 signees in 2015. That’s not too surprising, considering how large and talent-rich the state is. Of the top 25 players in California, 21 signed with Pac-12 schools. The other four signed with Alabama, Tennessee, Notre Dame and San Jose State.
  • Each Pac-12 program signed at least one player from California in the 2015 class (that’s the only state with which that’s true this season). On average, there are 11 signees from California in each recruiting class this season. Though it’s USC who leads the way with 17 signees from California, Washington State was right on the Trojans’ heels with 16 signees from Cali.
  • The state of Washington showed out pretty well in the conference. While there was only one player from Washington in the ESPN 300, there were 16 signees from the state who landed with Pac-12 programs.
  • The only program to not sign a player from the program’s home state was Oregon. However, there were five players from Oregon that did sign with Pac-12 programs. Those players ended up at Arizona (1), Oregon State (2), Stanford (1) and Washington (1).
  • Players staying home: Arizona and Arizona State signed seven players from Arizona; California, Stanford, UCLA and USC signed 48 players from California; Colorado signed four players from Colorado; Oregon State signed two players from Oregon; Utah signed three players from Utah; and Washington and Wazzu signed a total of nine players from Washington.
  • The most national class (meaning the team that signed the players from the most number of states) was Stanford, which signed players from 13 states. The least national class was USC, which signed players from just six states.

But what about the concentration of top talent in the 2015 class?

Again, unsurprisingly, California leads the way. The Golden State makes up half of the four-star and five-star players in the 2015 Pac-12 class. USC snagged five-star cornerback Iman Marshall, who hails from Long Beach, California, and 33 of the 66 four-stars in the 2015 class are also from California.

But this is where there’s a bit of a changeup. Of the 14 players from Texas that signed in the 2015 class, five (36 percent) are four-star players who landed at Pac-12 programs. After that -- with the exception of three four-star players from Georgia -- the majority of the top talent, again, hails from the traditional Pac-12 region.

[+] EnlargeChris Clark
Joe Faraoni/ESPN ImagesIt's not often that the Pac-12 pulls top prospects from Connecticut, such as UCLA-bound tight end Chris Clark.
Five-stars:

  • Hawaii: 1
  • California: 1
Four-stars:

  • California: 33
  • Texas: 5
  • Washington: 4
  • Arizona: 3
  • Georgia: 3
  • Utah: 3
  • Two four-star signees: Louisiana, North Carolina, Nevada, Oklahoma
  • One four-star signee: South Carolina, Colorado, Missouri, Tennessee, Florida, Connecticut, Hawaii

More notes:

  • Notably, the conference signed a four-star and five-star player from Hawaii. There were only four players in the state that were four- or five-star players. The two players who didn’t sign with a Pac-12 team went to Texas Tech and BYU. Both had Pac-12 offers.
  • The conference also cleaned up -- in regard to snagging the limited top talent out of state -- in Nevada. There were only three four-star players in Nevada and two ended up in the Pac-12 (UCLA and USC). The other player signed with Notre Dame.
  • More impressively, the conference was able to sign one of two four-star players out of Connecticut (TE Chris Clark, UCLA). When considering the distance between Nevada and the Pac-12 and Connecticut and the Pac-12, this is quite a recruiting feat.

As these players get more into the programs and possibly become big Pac-12 contributors, it will only open up these national pipelines more, making the conference’s footprint even bigger.
When asked to select my three favorite Pac-12 players from the recently released Ultimate ESPN 300, it became a far tougher assignment than Tuesday's five surprises or Wednesday's five intriguing recruitments.

Quarterbacks Andrew Luck, Matt Barkley, Marcus Mariota and Brett Hundley authored so many standout moments that it was difficult to separate any of them. Stanford maulers such as David Yankey, David DeCastro and Andrus Peat, along with super tailback Toby Gerhart, helped Stanford become one of the most physically impressive teams in the nation. Pass-catchers such as Brandin Cooks, Keenan Allen and USC's duo of Robert Woods and Marqise Lee could each be the subject of feature-length highlight films.

But when it came down to it, turns out I'm just a sucker for two- (and sometimes three-) way football.

Adoree' Jackson

After a strong true freshman season, Jackson is already No. 38 in the Ultimate 300 and the No. 4 USC Trojan on the list. Jackson was USC's best cornerback in 2014, turned three of his 10 receptions into touchdowns and brought back two kickoffs for scores. Jackson's signature plays in 2014 came in the Trojans' bowl game against Nebraska, when he put USC's first points on the board with a 98-yard kickoff return touchdown, then scored the first touchdown of the second half by turning a short pass into a 71-yard score.

Shaq Thompson

Thompson was a star on both sides of the ball for Washington in 2014 and has the Paul Hornung Award -- given to the nation's most versatile player -- to prove it. Any number of plays from this past season come up when Thompson's name is mentioned, including his 100-yard fumble return against Cal, his performance against Illinois when he scored two defensive touchdowns, and his back-to-back 100-yard rushing games against Colorado and UCLA. During his junior year, Thompson rushed for 456 yards and two touchdowns, and totaled 81 tackles, four fumble recoveries and three forced fumbles, as he rocketed up from No. 231 to No. 87 in the newest Ultimate 300.

Myles Jack

As a true freshman, Jack was inserted as a tailback against Arizona, and almost immediately everything changed for Jack and the Bruins. He rushed six times for 120 yards, including a 66-yard scoring run against the Wildcats, as the legend of Myles Jack was born. He tallied four rushing touchdowns against Washington and was named the Offensive and Defensive Freshman of the Year in the Pac-12 in 2013. In 2014, Jack took a step back from the offensive side of the ball, but still rushed for three touchdowns. He was great again on defense, racking up 88 tackles and an interception. He checks in at No. 238 on the Ultimate 300, and like the other two listed above, he's capable of adding to his highlight tape in any number of ways.
Not all recruitments are created equal, as some see prospects commit to their dream school early and never waver, while others have more twists and turns than a Formula 1 race. Taking a look through the recently released 2015 Ultimate 300, we spotlight five of the more interesting recruitments in the Pac-12, alphabetically by prospect.

A quick check of the recently released Ultimate ESPN 300 reveals a strong Pac-12 quarterback presence toward the top of the list. The three conference quarterbacks in the top 25 are tied for the most players at one position from one conference.

Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck leads the way for the Pac-12 at No. 9. He’s the No. 2 quarterback on the list and the top-10 player that made the biggest jump from his original ranking, moving all the way from No. 61 in the 2008 class. USC quarterback Matt Barkley checks in at No. 11, one of 15 current or former Trojans on the list. Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota is in at No. 25, as his Heisman Trophy-winning season resulted in a huge rise from last year, where he was No. 228. Mariota and fellow Heisman winner Johnny Manziel are the only two of the top 36 prospects that were not ranked in the ESPN 150 or 300 of their recruiting class.

With that group firmly established as the top three Pac-12 quarterbacks since ESPN rankings began with the 2006 class, we take a look at the present and future of the conference, with three quarterbacks in each of those groups that could eventually play their way into a future Ultimate ESPN 300.


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Pac-12 2015 recruiting in review 

February, 12, 2015
Feb 12
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video
The Pac-12 landed six top-30 recruiting classes and 47 ESPN 300 prospects as every program brought in potential immediate, impact players capable of making an impression on the 2015 season. Here, we take a look back at the recruiting cycle and signing day, and hand out some superlatives for the 2015 recruiting class.


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How resilient was your defense in 2014?

Last Thursday, we looked at the teams in the Pac-12 and how well they produced points after turnovers. This was the South Division, and here was the North. Now, we look at the flip side.

It can be frustrating when, after a big defensive stand, the offense coughs it up and gives the ball right back. Time for the defense to take the field again, be it inside their own red zone, the 50 or the opponent’s 1-yard line. (Or if you’re Shaq Thompson, just run it back 100 yards.)

Just like offensive points off of turnovers, there are exceptions. Sometimes a team gets a turnover at the end of the half or a game, so the defense doesn’t have to make a stand. So these numbers aren’t completely cut-and-dried. But rather it’s a measuring stick.

We looked at the South earlier today, and now we turn our attention to the North. If you’re curious how your team did last year, here are the numbers for the South and the numbers for the North.

California

Turnovers committed: 20
Opponent scores vs. opportunities: 10-20 (50 percent)
Total points allowed after turnovers: 69
Games without committing at least one turnover: 2
Games without allowing points after turnovers: 3

Oregon

Turnovers committed: 11
Opponent scores vs. opportunities: 3-11 (27 percent)
Total points allowed after turnovers: 13
Games without committing at least one turnover: 7
Games without allowing points after turnovers: 5

Oregon State

Turnovers committed: 14
Opponent scores vs. opportunities: 9-14 (64 percent)
Total points allowed after turnovers: 43
Games without committing at least one turnover: 3
Games without allowing points after turnovers: 3

Stanford

Turnovers committed: 21
Opponent scores vs. opportunities: 6-21 (28 percent)
Total points allowed after turnovers: 38
Games without committing at least one turnover: 1
Games without allowing points after turnovers: 7

Washington

Turnovers committed: 17
Opponent scores vs. opportunities: 10-17 (58 percent)
Total points allowed after turnovers: 53
Games without committing at least one turnover: 5
Games without allowing points after turnovers: 2

Washington State

Turnovers committed: 25
Opponent scores vs. opportunities: 18-25 (72 percent)
Total points allowed after turnovers: 114
Games without committing at least one turnover: 2
Games without allowing points after turnovers: 1

Pac-12 morning links

February, 6, 2015
Feb 6
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You're gonna need a bigger boat.

Happy Friday.

Leading off

February 4 is long gone, but don't think that the drama of national signing day has vanished with the date. UCLA is still at the center of some national attention because linebacker Roquan Smith, one of their touted Wednesday commits, hasn't faxed his national letter of intent to Westwood. Smith is reportedly concerned that Bruins defensive coordinator Jeff Ulbrich has been in talks with the Atlanta Falcons, news that leaked shortly after Smith's commitment to UCLA but before his pledge to the Bruins became binding.

Smith may feel fortunate that he's not in the same boat as Ohio State recruit Mike Weber, who found Buckeyes running backs coach Stan Drayton was leaving to the NFL after he was locked into Urban Meyer's program.

In the case of Smith, UCLA, Georgia, Michigan, and Texas A&M are still technically alive in the battle for his services, and the saga will likely stretch into next week.

"[The recruiting period] isn't over until the end of April," Smith's coach said. "So there's no rush."

So in case any Pac-12 recruiting fans thought signing day would present a cut and dry finish to the 2015 cycle, think again. We're going to overtime, and it'll be a while longer before the drama fully subsides and the pre-spring ball vacation is here.

News/notes/team reports
  • Arizona's DaVonte' Neal is changing positions to help a thinned-out Wildcats defense. Read about the switch here.
  • .One of Arizona State's biggest victories this recruiting season came through the signing of defensive tackle prospect Joseph Wicker.
  • Is Cal football trying to mimic how Stanford recruits?
  • Colorado's series with an in-state rival is likely to end after 2020.
  • More signing day aftermath: This piece examines Oregon's slow-and-steady recruiting style.
  • A developing Oregon State trend: Polynesian players. The Beavers just signed eight of them.
  • Offensive lineman Kevin Reihner has exercised a graduate transfer to Penn State, and David Shaw indicated that he's not the only Stanford player who's been mulling his future options.
  • Chronicling UCLA's Jeff Ulbrich/Roquan Smith saga.
  • When it comes to recruiting, Steve Sarkisian has finished strong at USC.
  • Grading Utah's coaches for their 2014 performance while looking ahead to 2015.
  • Chris Petersen believes he has something special at Washington in Jake Browning.
  • Washington State has lost wide receivers coach Dennis Simmons to Oklahoma.
Just for fun

Here's another "my, how times have changed" glimpse at college football, featuring a former USC Heisman Trophy winner.

The turnover battle is the consummate game within the game. You want them. Coaches love them. They can be momentum-swinging game-changers.

However, they can also be wasted drives. Sure, a turnover is nice because you take the ball out of the hands of the opposing offense. But if you can’t turn those turnovers into points, you’re just using clock. And with so many up-tempo offenses in the Pac-12, that’s not always that big of a deal.

Obviously, points off of turnovers aren’t the end-all-be all. Sometimes a turnover can end a game, such was the case with Scooby Wright stripping Marcus Mariota or J.R. Tavai’s strip-sack of Kevin Hogan. No points were scored, yet it decided the outcome. Washington State was one of the best teams in the conference at converting turnovers into points (75 percent). Problem is, the Cougars only forced eight all year.

So don’t take the following stats as cannon. Rather, they are a decent indicator of how your team did in 2014 at turning turnovers into points. Earlier today we looked at the Pac-12 South. Now we look at the North. And tomorrow, we’ll flip the script and look at points allowed following a turnover.

If you’re curious, here are last year’s totals so you can see if your team improved or regressed.

California

Turnovers created: 17
Scores vs. opportunities: 9-17 (52 percent)
Total points after turnovers: 65
Games without forcing at least one turnover: 2
Games without points after turnovers: 4

Oregon

Turnovers created: 34
Scores vs. opportunities: 25-34 (73 percent)
Total points after turnovers: 164
Games without forcing at least one turnover: 1
Games without points after turnovers: 2

Oregon State

Turnovers created: 18
Scores vs. opportunities: 11-18 (61 percent)
Total points after turnovers: 60
Games without forcing at least one turnover: 3
Games without points after turnovers: 1

Stanford

Turnovers created: 16
Scores vs. opportunities: 8-16 (50 percent)
Total points after turnovers: 44
Games without forcing at least one turnover: 5
Games without points after turnovers: 1

Washington

Turnovers created: 29
Scores vs. opportunities: 18-29 (62 percent)
Total points after turnovers: 109
Games without forcing at least one turnover: 3
Games without points after turnovers: 1

Washington State

Turnovers created: 8
Scores vs. opportunities: 6-8 (75 percent)
Total points after turnovers: 34
Games without forcing at least one turnover: 5
Games without points after turnovers: 2

Pac-12 morning links

February, 5, 2015
Feb 5
9:00
AM ET
The exclusive club of Pac-12 football officially has a couple hundred new members, so today's movie quote relates to that.

The first rule of Pac-12 football is: You do not talk about Pac-12 football.

Actually, that's not true. You are allowed to talk a lot about Pac-12 football. That's what this blog is all about. So, let's discuss morning links in the wake of national signing day.

Leading off

Wednesday marked the end of an arduous selection process for thousands of prospective collegiate student-athletes. They finally had a chance to make their decisions official while fax machines relished the opportunity to be relevant again. Signing day was particularly kind to the L.A. schools -- USC flexed its recruiting muscle to finish with one of the nation's top-rated classes while UCLA made an eye-popping closing surge -- but noteworthy developments populated all corners of the conference.

Perhaps the best way to summarize the day lies in this conference map, which plots the hometown of every single recruit that signed on to play Pac-12 football yesterday. It was a true nationwide operation. A team-by-team look is below.

News/notes/team reports
  • Signing day in Tucson didn't generate much fanfare, but Rich Rodriguez thinks he's inked his kind of guys.
  • There was only one surprise in Arizona State's recruiting class, which ended up looking like a strong haul that included a handful of four-star recruits from the Southern California hotbed.
  • Ryan Gorcey delivers anything and everything related to Cal's signing day right here. The Bears are hoping a handful of additions in the secondary will be able to contribute immediately.
  • Five -- and maybe six -- players in Colorado's 2015 recruiting class are expected to contribute as true freshmen this fall.
  • Five takeaways from Oregon's 2015 recruiting class.
  • Gary Andersen had to scramble to salvage Oregon State's recruiting class after he took over for Mike Riley in December. Here's a final evaluation.
  • Here is Andy Drukarev's detailed account of Stanford's signing day, which came and went without any surprises.
  • Keep an eye on this developing story involving the Atlanta Falcons' interest in UCLA defensive coordinator Jeff Ulbrich.
  • The national media thinks that USC and their crosstown rivals were among America's big signing day winners.
  • Tracking Utah's signing day.
  • A live, time-stamped log of how signing day went for Washington.
  • Mike Leach says that his 2015 class is the best of the four he's netted at Washington State.
Just for fun

Snoop Dogg had long been a USC fan, but his son Cordell Broadus signed with UCLA Wednesday, so it appears the rapper has switched allegiances.

Now he wit mora. N so am I. Let's go!!!(<<=L

A photo posted by snoopdogg (@snoopdogg) on

Completed class: Washington Huskies

February, 4, 2015
Feb 4
2:18
PM ET
Washington has announced its 2015 class:

ESPN 300
Jake Browning QB-PP -- Folsom High School, California
Austin Joyner, RB -- Marysville-Pilchuck High School, Washington

Four-stars
Chico McClatcher, RB -- Federal Way High School, Washington
Trey Adams, OT -- Wenatchee High School, Washington

Three-stars
Benning Potoae, DT -- Lakes High School, Washington
Isaiah Renfro, WR -- Sierra Canyon High School, California
Henry Roberts, OT -- Bellevue High School, Washington
Ezekiel Turner, S -- Los Angeles Pierce College, Maryland
D.J. Beavers, OLB -- Crespi Carmelite High School, California
Andre Baccellia, WR -- Westlake High School, California
Ben Burr-Kirven, OLB -- Sacred Heart Prep, California
Kyler Manu, OLB -- Highland High School, Idaho
Myles Gaskin, RB -- O'Dea High School, Washington
Jason Scrempos, DE -- Milpitas High School, California
Michaeal Neal, TE-H -- Etiwanda High School, California
Myles Rice, DE -- George Bush High School, Texas
Jared Hilbers, OT -- Beaverton High School, Oregon
Tevis Bartlett, ATH -- East High School, Wyoming
Ricky McCoy, TE-H -- Bullard High School, California
Jordan Miller, CB -- Oceanside High School, California
Bryce Sterk, DE -- Lynden High School, Washington
Jusstis Warren, OLB -- Lincoln High School, Washington
Quinten Pounds, ATH -- Cypress High School, California

Two-stars
A.J. Carty, LS -- Servite High School, California

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