Commentary

Connecticut 76, Maryland 50

Originally Published: March 30, 2013
By Kate Fagan | espnW

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. -- Quick reaction to Connecticut's 76-50 win over Maryland:

Overview: After a few minutes of back-and-forth in the game's opening minutes, the Huskies started pulling away. Connecticut led by as many as 14 points in the first half and went to halftime ahead 35-26. Things got worse for the Terrapins after the break, as UConn made it a 20-point game (52-32) with 13 minutes, 16 seconds remaining. The game was never in doubt in the second half.

Turning point: There really wasn't one -- the Huskies simply built a lead and kept their foot on the gas. They won this game with swift ball movement and steady, relentless defense.

[+] EnlargeGeno Auriemma, Stefanie Dolson
Mark L. Baer/USA TODAY SportsAs ESPN's Holly Rowe reported Saturday, Stefanie Dolson is suffering from a stress fracture in her left fibula. The UConn center also appeared to tweak her knee in the win over Maryland.

Key player: Connecticut freshman forward Breanna Stewart played a strong all-around game, finishing with 17 points, 8 rebounds, 4 blocks and 3 steals. She presented a tough matchup for the Terrapins, who couldn't stop her dribble-drives from the wing. Stewart also did a nice job keeping the ball alive on the glass, often crashing for tips and deflections.

Key stat: Field goal percentage. The Huskies finished the game shooting 47.8 percent from the floor (32-for-67), and Maryland managed only 31.1 percent (19-for-61).

What's next: Top-seeded Connecticut moves on to play No. 2 seed Kentucky in the finals of the Bridgeport Regional. On the line? A trip to the Final Four in New Orleans. The Huskies are looking to advance to their 15th Final Four in school history (and an NCAA-record sixth straight), and the Wildcats hope to make their first appearance. … Maryland finishes its season at 26-8. The Terrapins will look to regroup during the summer after a rough season that saw them lose multiple players to knee injuries.

Kate Fagan

Columnist, espnW.com

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